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dtac Responsible Business

The long road to zero-carbon phone calls

dtac’s Head of Technology Strategy calls for innovation in data, energy tech and policy to reach telecoms industry climate goals. After 13 days of intense negotiations, COP26 UN Climate Change Conference concluded on November 13 with almost 200 countries agreeing on the Glasgow Climate Pact. The declaration significantly ramps up the call for greater action and financing for adaptation to pursue efforts to stay within 1.5 degrees Celsius of global warming by 2050. In parallel, the GSMA board, on which sits the largest mobile network operators in the world, set a milestone to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2050. To reach that objective, dtac has set its own goal of halving its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. dtacblog spoke to Navneet Nayan, Head of Technology Strategy & Service Management at dtac to better understand what it will take for dtac to reach its targets, and how the telecoms industry can rethink operations for resilience and sustainability. Everyone is an Emitter Telcos are energy intensive, with two to three percent of global consumption, according to GSMA. The mobile industry is therefore a relatively small, but growing, contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. End users consume about half of that energy with…

dtac Net for Living and Painterbell Team up to Celebrate 50+ Creative Entrepreneurs Going Digital for the First Time

21 December 2021 – dtac synergized with artist Painterbell to create lively caricatures and celebrate 14 brands founded by older entrepreneurs across Thailand. These entrepreneurs were digitally upskilled and coached to retail online by the dtac Net for Living program as part of the “Coaching Mission for 50+ Entrepreneurs” campaign. The campaign helped older entrepreneurs move their small businesses to social media and inspire digital audiences through their amazing products. Selected products from this campaign are now available as New Year gifts via the #ShopforSmile campaign. Users can browse these gift ideas any time, any day on the dtac Net for Living Facebook page.  dtac Gift Guide: 14 Exciting Thai Brands Making Local Delectable Foods and Creative Wares Tote bags by YaiSiri are a fusion of traditional Thai craft, local fabrics, and contemporary cuts, decorated with festive motifs of the Christmas and New Year season. The brand is the brainchild of Archarn Nong – Siripati Phumchan – who branched out into online retailing at the age of 52. Apart from their attractive look and heartwarming story, another reason to love YaiSiri products is that they are designed for accessibility, with blind people especially in mind. The brand also offers a…

Thailand’s Most Instagram-able Fishing Village Goes Digital

Samaesan is a picturesque seaside village almost halfway between Bangkok and Thailand’s frontier with Cambodia. Its score of long piers is sheltered behind a sprinkling of verdant islands, allowing for particularly calm and crystalline waters. This ideal location has long attracted vibrantly colored fishing boats, which will drop off the night’s catch at daybreak for eager buyers to haggle over. But behind the postcard appearances, Samaesan’s fishing crews also face many challenges such as stringent export regulations and a scarcity of labor. A few enterprising locals thus turned to hosting the occasional diving and fishing trips to supplement their incomes. But it wasn’t until the eruption of social media that Samaesan started to take off as a hotspot for nature-starve Bangkokians. Instrumental to this transformation is Umnat Chuanak. Although born in Samaesan, Mr. Umnat worked for 15 years as an engineer before fully committing himself to running a homestay, Yaya Malee Resort & Snorkeling. “I always loved to come home. Even when I was an engineer, I’d come back here between jobs. But I thought that even if I ever got to realize my dream of having a homestay here, it would just be four rooms for friends,” he told…

Thai social enterprise wants elderly to go digital

Thailand has become a full-fledged aging society since 2021. Its elderly population (those over 60 years old) now accounts for about 20 percent of the total population, and that number is expected to rise to more than one third or about 20 million people. To better understand the so-called “silver tsunami,” dtacblog spoke to Thanakorn Phromyos, CEO and Co-founder of YoungHappy, a social enterprise that works to promote active aging and is a partner of dtac. He shared with us his inspiration in starting the social enterprise and the ambition to help seniors stay engaged, active and happy. Social Enterprise As an only child, Mr. Thanakorn, a graduate in aerospace engineering, wanted to become financially successful in order to take good care of his parents. But after his father retired, he started noticing that his father grew much older and started losing pride in himself. This, combined with his keen interest in solving social issues, inspired him to begin his journey as a social entrepreneur. “I’m always interested in finding solutions to social and environment issues, and I have participated in several volunteer programs,” he said. “One day I came across this book by Muhammad Yunus, a Bangladeshi banker and…

Army officer turns digital retailer of Thai delicacies

Salted eggs are a prized condiment in Thailand and across Asia. Usually made from duck eggs, they are soaked in brine or packed in damp, salted charcoal. But with retirement age approaching, this military officer decided to perfect his own recipe and make a business of it. By embracing digital channels, he was even able to make it his full-time job. Inspired by the Online World Wanchai Iamkai, 50, is a former commissioned military officer from Phitsanulok who decided to leave his military career behind to run his online business full-time. “I was the chief of a special warfare unit looking after the 17 provinces in Northern Thailand. I had been a professional military man for my entire career, spending most of it in Mae Hong Son on peacekeeping missions along the borders,” Mr. Wanchai said. “I have always been an active person and really wanted to make the most out of my free time. Then I had this idea of making salted eggs.” Mr. Wanchai credits his inspiration to the army’s housewives, who form tightly knit and very active groups that often produce their own foodstuffs. They taught him to make salted eggs, which only requires a few and…

Chili Paste Goes Digital to Boost Small Village

How a maker of traditional oyster chili paste embraced online tools to protect the incomes of women in Surat Thani Thailand’s Department of Agricultural Extension established the “Farmer Housewife Groups (กลุ่มแม่บ้านเกษตรกร)” in 1970 to empower women in the agricultural sector. Today, around 6.47 million women work in the agricultural sector. The group’s members still come together on a voluntary basis to process agricultural produce into products, which helps increase their household income and improve their living conditions amid growing challenges due to climate change and volatile crop prices. Today, there are around 20,000 such groups nationwide. dtacblog spoke to Benjanart Kongchareon of Sontiwat Farmer Housewife Group in Surat Thani. A participant in the dtac Net for Living program, she turns local produce into popular OTOP (One Tambon One Product) products with seven-figure sales (in Thai baht). Building a Brand Identity Ka Dae sub-district is located in the Southern province of Surat Thani. Most people there are farmers, growing palm trees, rubber trees, longan, mangosteen, durian or various vegetables. Others own oyster farms, which is one of Surat Thani’s signature products. However, in the past decade, extreme weather and climate change has resulted in longer summers, heavy downpours, and frequent floods…

Youths call for continued guidance to tackle online bullying amid increased internet use

68 percent say that bullying online is a serious problem for them today 21 October 2021- More than two-thirds (68 percent) of 3,930 youths surveyed from Bangladesh, Malaysia, Pakistan, and Thailand agreed that online bullying is a serious problem for young people today. Of the youths surveyed, 1 in 4 (25 percent) said they were bullied before the pandemic began and in terms of intensity, almost a third (29 percent) said they experienced more online bullying since the onset of COVID-19. The survey, conducted in August 2021 by Telenor Group, in partnership with Plan International, found that 14 percent of youths experienced online bullying at least once a week or more.  Respondents selected social media, messaging apps, and online gaming and video game streaming as top three platforms where they experienced online bullying. The survey also revealed that youths who were bullied online used a range of tactics to stop the bullying. These spanned from ignoring the bully which resulted in the person stopping, changing security settings online so the person could not contact them, and speaking to a parent or guardian about the problem. Refreshers on staying safe online needed “With the marked increase in time spent on the…

dtac breaks isolation of village in Lampang

Lack of connectivity in Ban Mai Samakki Village became unbearable with COVID-19. Then dtac stepped in. The Ban Mai Samakki community was established in 2003 in Thailand’s Northern province of Lampang. But until September 2021, it had neither landline nor cell phone coverage. As COVID-19 accelerated digital transformation in Thailand, the community’s lack of connectivity turned into a full-blown crisis. With schools closed, children walked two kilometers every day to catch the nearest mobile signal and connect with their teachers online. The threat of being unable to make an emergency call without making a 40-min hike also became increasingly risky in the midst of a pandemic. Supud Rala, is the village headman of Ban Mai Samakki, a community of 495 persons, most of them maize farmers. “We sell our crops while raising chicken and pigs for our own consumption. Women also make additional income from handcrafted bags, scarves, and skirts. All our water comes from the river, wells and rainwater. We didn’t even have electricity until 2016,” he said. Communication is a key issue in this community, rendering it virtually cut off from the outside world. The closest mobile phone signal can be found on a ridge about 2 km…

Chiang Mai woman goes mobile and digital to live independently in her senior years

According to the National Statistical Office of Thailand, there are about 13 million elderly in Thailand (aged over 60), one-third of whom live alone or with their senior partners. Without adequate social safety nets, this could impact their livelihood and poses social and economic challenges to the country as it is stepping into a ‘super aged[1]’ society in the next decade. Aging Alone In Chiang Mai’s Saraphi district, hundreds of elders live alone. They have been abandoned by their family or don’t receive adequate care. Local administrative bodies, foundations, and the civil society have stepped in to offer support in various forms. One of them is Kunyasa Chaikularb, a former social worker from Chiang Rai. Ms. Kunyasa moved to Chiang Mai two decades ago to start her social work career at a foundation whose aim was to improve livelihood of children orphaned by HIV and AIDS. Later she received funding from foreigners who wanted to help out people with physical disabilities and the elderly who live alone and need support. “I started working to support unaccompanied seniors after I witnessed these problems myself. Many older people spend their final years as a worker at longan plantations, earning a daily wage…

dtac Net for Living digitally upskills Seniors to Boost Silver Economy

September 29, 2021 – dtac Net for Living, is upgrading the digital skills of Thailand’s seniors with a focus on self-employed entrepreneurs aged 50 up. In partnership with dtac, the Digital Economy Promotion Agency, the Internet Foundation for the Development, and social enterprise Young Happy, the first batch of 250 trainees are expected to build their resilience in today’s challenging economic climate. Sharad Mehrotra, chief executive officer of Total Access Communication Plc or dtac, said, “Aging society is a mega trend of the 21st Century. The United Nations has predicted that the population aged 65 and above will double to 1.5 billion by 2050.  Thailand is also heading towards this direction, with its elderly expected to grow from 20 percent today to 28 percent in 2033. In 30 years, Thai persons aged 50 and above are expected to account for 50 per cent of the total population or around 30 million people. If we don’t ensure seniors are digitally savvy, they will struggle to access healthcare, banking and government services. We also predict that they will need digital skills to develop additional income streams. Hence, dtac Net for Living is committed to closing the digital gap affecting Thailand’s seniors.” The…