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dtac Transformation

dtac’s Photos of the Year

The year 2020 has been repeatedly described as unprecedented—and Time Magazine even dubbed it “the worst year ever”. But it’s also been an opportunity to reflect on our priorities in life.More than ever before, dtac’s twin purposes of “Connecting you to what matters most” and “Empowering societies,” have felt critical to Thailand.As 2020 ends, dtacblog has compiled images retracing some of the year’s defining moments. Think of it as one last look in the rearview mirror as 2021 brings a fresh start. “We were on the frontlines,” Wasan Chanplab, Head of Field Network Operations BMA at dtac.Picture 1 : At the height of the April 2020 COVID-19 lockdown in Thailand, the Field Network Operations BMA’s team rushed to Siriraj Hospital to perform service maintenance. Not only dtac’s network teams worked tirelessly to ensure doctors, nurses and other hospital staff remained connected, but dtac would go on to partner with Siriraj Hospital to onboard chronic patients to the Siriraj Connect application.“We couldn’t let COVID-19 disrupt dtac services—particularly in a hospital. Our team worked even harder to ensure the network was fine. There is no day off in such a crisis. We are on standby round the clock. And we are proud…

Nakul Sehgal appointed CFO of dtac

dtac's board of directors has approved the appointment of Mr. Nakul Sehgal as the company’s new Chief Financial Officer (CFO). Mr. Sehgal replaces Mr. Dilip Pal, who is already announced to leave dtac by 31 October 2020. Mr. Sehgal comes with extensive experience in telecom, most recently as the Corporate Chief Financial Officer of Bharti Airtel. He has previously held CFO positions in Digi.com (Malaysia), Telenor Hungary and Telenor India. Mr. Sehgal also has consulting experience working with Ernst & Young and PricewaterhouseCoopers prior to joining the industry. He is a Chartered Accountant and holds a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Delhi. Commenting on the appointment of Mr. Sehgal, Sharad Mehrotra, CEO of dtac, said: “I am extremely pleased to have Nakul Sehgal join the dtac team. In addition to his strong track record as CFO in companies across multiple markets, . I know Nakul as a strong leader focused on performance and efficiency. With his background, Nakul will be able to add value to dtac and our customers from day one.” Commenting on his decision to join dtac, Mr. Sehgal said: “dtac has been at the forefront of innovation and digitalization, while achieving great results in challenging…

Look into “back-end system” and its importance to digital transformation

During COVID-19 crisis, several business activities have slowed down due to social-distancing measures. The New Normal, however, has given a big boom to e-commerce. Priceza, a provider of product search engine and price-comparison shopping site, has lately estimated that Thailand’s e-commerce market will be worth Bt220 billion this year. With such 35-per-cent growth, e-commerce will then account for between four and five per cent of the country’s retail industry. The figures reflect the fast-changing business landscape in the face of digital-disruption trend. Online distribution looks set to become main distribution channels in the future. For a business to move ahead in this direction with efficiency, it definitely needs a good “back-end system”. Fast, Stable and Secure Porravee Niloubol, assistant head of sales at dtac Business, says consumers’ purchase decisions are based on several factors such as product quality, brands, purchasing convenience, and after-sales services. In the digital age, consumers want greater convenience and thus “customer experiences” become key components of customer-journey. The backbone of great customer journey in the digital age is “IT system”. Considered a back-end system, it has integrated “data” for business management, solutions, and decision-making. “Business fads are changing fast these days. Each one catches on so…

Connectivity’s role in fighting COVID-19

As the global tally for declared COVID-19 cases nears six million, Thailand has emerged relatively unscathed. Credit is being given to a public health strategy that effectively coordinated medical workers and the cutting-edge technology. dtac bloghad spoke to two key players at the Department of Disease Control (DDC), the main government agency in flattening the curve: Thanarak Plipat, its deputy chief, and Phathai Singkham, Head of Disease Prevention and Health Innovation Center. The mission to flatten the curve Thanarak Plipat said the public health strategy to slow down the spread of the novel coronavirus 2019 rests on four pillars: prevention, surveillance, treatment and control. Prevention involves mitigating the virus’s spread by encouraging adequate hygiene  such as frequently washing hands with water and soap, wearing a face mask, avoiding groups of people, eating hot food and using serving spoons for shared dishes. The information campaigns were targeted even more intensively in workers housing, migrant communities and elderly hospices. Surveillance is the systematic collection, analysis and dissemination of health data for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs. This also includes active surveillance, which involves monitoring the spread of the coronavirus disease in order to establish the patterns of disease…

dtac’s virtual CEO breakfasts aim to reinvent digital experiences in the new normal

With video conferencing replacing face-to-face meetings, dtac CEO Sharad Mehrotra has been hosting virtual breakfasts to restore a bit of warmth and humanity to business proceedings. His first virtual breakfasts welcomed the teams working on the dtac app and on Jaidee services. Fittingly, they discussed the changing nature of digital channels in the new normal. dtacblog joined the breakfast sessions to get an inside view on where dtac customers are headed in the COVID-19 era. On the first virtual breakfast, Mr. Mehrotra was tucking into a plate of fresh fruit while the Jaidee team sipped coffee he had delivered to their home. “Prepaid users are traditionally considered less digitally-savvy than their postpaid counterparts, but that’s becoming less true. Being digital is a question of survival in this economic situation,” said Nussaraporn Sumretphol, Head of the Value Creation Unit. “What we’re seeing is that even when money is tight, we have prepaid customers choosing unlimited internet, even if it is capped at 128kpbs, to have access to LINE messenger. It goes beyond entertainment. You can’t find work or connect with customers if you don’t have internet. And we offer it to them for just a few baht a day.” That view…

dtac CEO: “Supporting Thailand in the New Normal”

Dear customers, The threat of COVID-19 infections will end one day, although it will be many months. Even so, we are in a new normal that is here to stay no matter what: Digital channels will grow even more quickly than we had anticipated. Certain forms of social distancing measures will remain indefinitely. Recovering from the COVID-19’s economic impact will take a long time. Change is always scary but dtac responded to the COVID-19 situation quickly and effectively. And we will continue to do so. DIGITAL CHANNELS In March, dtac saw an explosion in the use of productivity apps like Zoom and Office 365. Usage of the dtac app also grew by 30 percent since the emergency decree, while daily user on dtac.co.th increased by 40% for the same period (March 25-April 23). We supported these changes with numerous measures for our customers: New packages with free data on productivity apps that are essential to Thailand’s economy. Incentives for new users of the dtac app, such as free data. Contingency measures to both maintain and continue developing our network. On the last point, dtac can continue to operate its Network Operation Center even if our headquarters were shut down. (In…

How our mobility data can help predict and prevent the spread of COVID-19

Source: TELENOR In an effort to battle the COVID-19 spread, Telenor provides mobility data on population movement to Norwegian health authorities. “Blue is definitely my favorite color these days,” says Kenth Engø-Monsen. The senior researcher at Telenor Research gazes at the blue dots popping up on his screen. The darker the shade of blue, the more Engø-Monsen smiles. “What we have here is data on people’s movement from one specific area to another. A red color means we have an increase in movement, while blue signals a decrease. The shades indicate the frequency. The darker it is, the lower the frequency,” Engø-Monsen explains. In front of the researcher is a digital map of Norway covered in blue. Much of it dark blue. The maps show people’s movement in Norway on 10 March (left) and 15 March, compared to people’s movement on the same day the previous week. The blue color a decrease in movement. “I have never before witnessed such a massive drop in people’s movement, as we are seeing now,” says Engø-Monsen. Mobility data shows ‘exceptional changes’ “Since the Norwegian government announced its lockdown measures on 12 March, we have seen exceptional changes in mobility. In some places, the…

From globalization to pandemic: How dtac manages its supply chain to keep customers connected

The world has become more interconnected in the last few decades. People, businesses and information in different parts of the world can be more easily integrated thanks to the emergence and evolution of Information Communication Technology (ICT). Globalization creates the free flow of trade and production, including outsourcing and offshoring of supply chains. Information technology plays a critical role in connecting the world through the internet. And the humble SIM card is one of the key elements in the connectivity supply chain. At dtac, there is a regular demand of SIM card (around 1.5 million per month) in addition to ten million cash cards every month (cards that contain a stored balance which can be used to top up a subscription). The spread of COVID-19 has had an inevitable impact on the global supply chain, which includes SIM and cash cards production. “The pandemic doesn’t only impact production, but also logistics, due to the state of emergency decree and curfew. There are unplanned events all the time these days. And this is challenging our team to be aware, analyze and make a decision in a timely manner to still keep our customers connected. This is our purpose at dtac: connecting…

The dtac app aims to make COVID-19 social distancing measures a rewarding experience

Every month, 1.4 million people visit dtac’s shops. But with the spread of COVID-19, social distancing and partial lockdown measures have been introduced to control its spread. Hundreds of dtac shops and retail points are now closed across the country. And customers who were accustomed to having sales agents assist them with routine operations such as bill payments and top ups, must now turn to digital channels. One such channel is the dtac app. And the team behind it isn’t satisfied with making it only an emergency alternative to shops. Instead, their ambition is to make an app that unlocks a whole new customer experience. Compelling customer experiences with personalization “Did you know that the main page of dtac app displays differently for each of customers?” asks Panthep Nilasinthop, Head of Digital B2C and Platform Division at dtac. He oversees digital channels across all platforms. He defines the dtac app as the “preferred channel” because more than 90% of dtac customers own a smartphone. You can manage your services and payments, get help, check for outages and track orders – all while you’re at home. “From the first day of the development of dtac app, it has been evolving from…

Sharad Mehrotra: A tech guy who embraces change yet plays his own game

On February 1, 2020, dtac appointed Sharad Mehrotra as chief executive. Mehrotra, formerly CEO of Telenor Myanmar, has over 20 years of experience in the telecommunications industry. In a wide-ranging interview, Mehrotra discusses his vision for the company, the beauty of working in the telecom industry, the importance of good teams, yoga and his favorite Thai dish. Originally hailing from the Indian city of Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, about 500 kilometers from the capital of New Delhi, Sharad Mehrotra had the childhood aspiration of becoming an engineer – one he fulfilled, by securing admission to the University of Pune, where he took up a degree in electrical engineering. “I think that was something like a dream coming true,” he says. “Those four years were a very exciting time for me – I was learning new things, and something very, very different.” Mehrotra immediately enrolled in an MBA program after engineering, after which he began his career with Ericsson in India, at the time when GSM (2G) was being rolled out in the country. “Working there was a game changer for me,” Mehrotra says of his time at Ericsson, crediting a training course at a regional assessment center for developing in him leadership…